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Frequently Asked Questions

Why is a home inspection a sound investment?

We have found our clients spend around 0.1% (one tenth of one percent) of the purchase price of their home on our home inspection services. That’s a small price to pay for the peace of mind that your new home won’t surprise you and turn into a money pit.

What are common issues reported when home inspections are performed?

The issues reported in home inspection results vary by construction materials, age, location, etc. It has been our experience that the items we see most often include *Evidence of Past Leaks (75% of homes inspected); *Roof Issues (55% of homes inspected – this is more prevalent in homes that are 20 years or older); *Safety Issues (electrical hazards, missing components, etc.) 45% of homes inspected; *Missing or non-working Smoke Detectors (35% of homes inspected); *Natural Gas Leaks Near Furnaces/Water Heaters 20% of homes inspected (flue and air ventilation problems almost always accompany these natural gas leaks).

Who should I consider to perform the home inspection?

The issues reported in home inspection results vary by construction materials, age, location, etc. It has been our experience that the items we see most often include *Evidence of Past Leaks (75% of homes inspected); *Roof Issues (55% of homes inspected – this is more prevalent in homes that are 20 years or older); *Safety Issues (electrical hazards, missing components, etc.) 45% of homes inspected; *Missing or non-working Smoke Detectors (35% of homes inspected); *Natural Gas Leaks Near Furnaces/Water Heaters 20% of homes inspected (flue and air ventilation problems almost always accompany these natural gas leaks).

How long does a home inspection take?

A typical home inspection should take between two and four hours, depending on the size of the structure and the accessibility of certain parts of the inspection.

Should I accompany the inspector during the inspection?

Most clients choose to be present during the home inspection. This allows the client to observe the same items as the inspector so there is a shared frame of reference when the client discusses the findings with the inspector. Accompanying the inspector during the inspection is a good avenue for the client to familiarize themselves with the home in question.

Is the inspection a warranty guarantee my home contains no problems?

No. Home inspection involves an individual inspector presenting the client with an opinion regarding the materials and condition of certain items involved in the inspection. Home inspectors are not able to guarantee or warranty any item in the home. Home warranties may be a possibility through other avenues in a real estate transaction.

How do I learn more about lead paint radon and mold?

The links below will take you to the EPA’s website pages concerning these subjects. Remember, they will not apply to all homes. Lead paint is usually only found in homes built prior to 1978. Radon levels vary from house to house, even in areas where radon occurs frequently. Moisture, mildew and mold issues vary greatly in form and how they affect people.
http://www.epa.gov/lead/leadinfo.htm
http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/citguide.html
http://www.epa.gov/iaq/molds/moldbasics.html

Where can I go for further information regarding home inspection?

www.ashi.org
www.realtytimes.com
www.hgtv.com

Why should a home inspection be performed?

All potential buyers should choose to have a home inspection done. A quality home inspection is the only way to inform yourself regarding your new home. A quality inspector will thoroughly check your home and report the findings back to you. Heard of “buyer beware?” Let a good home inspector make it a saying worth remembering.

Are home inspections a required in all real estate transactions?

No, but they should be! More and more are requiring a home inspection when a loan transaction is pending. Almost all HUD loans require a roof inspection before a loan can close. Home inspections mainly benefit the prospective buyer or new home owner. For this purpose, an inspector should be independent of any lending institutions or the seller’s real estate agencies. It is common for your real estate agent to recommend a good home inspector. If they don’t,you should find a good home inspector on your own and obtain an independent opinion regarding the state of the home.

What is checked in a home inspection?

Every inspector will have their own methods and standards for completing a home inspection. Make sure that as you consider an inspector you are considering inspectors who will give you the report findings that you desire. General important items involved in a home inspection include: the exterior materials/condition, the roof, the structural components, the plumbing system(s), the electrical system(s), the heating/air conditioning system(s), the interior construction materials/condition and various other items.

How much does a home inspection cost?

Costs of home inspections vary depending on the location of the home being inspected. Nationally, costs may vary depending on real estate prices in the area. In the state of Utah, most inspections of small homes cost around $225-$275. Many companies base their pricing on the requirements of the inspection (such as square footage or inspection options).

Do home inspectors check for code compliance?

No. Home inspectors check for possible maintenance issues and potential problems that may exist in a home. The focus of the inspection is to relay information regarding the materials and condition of the home.

Are home inspections limited to potential buyers of new-homes?

No. Home inspections are a great idea for many types of people. In the case of a potential buyer for a new home, the inspection benefits the potential buyer by informing them regarding their home before they buy. A home inspection may also benefit a potential renter for a house, apartment, condo, or town home.

Do any government agencies have any recommendations on home inspections?

Yes, most government agencies that are involved in real estate transactions will provide information on their websites about home inspections. The two links below give information on why Freddie Mac and HUD recommend hiring a professional home inspector.

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